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20121128
20121206
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
they're troubled by what the united nations ambassador susan rice is telling them. and now the acting cia director has some serious problems as well. president obama pulls out all the stops to keep middle class taxes low, but will congress go along with higher taxes for the rich? plus, a long secret u.s. plan, get this, to explode an atomic bomb on the moon. what were they thinking? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> today we may be at the tipping point for one of the most important decisions president obama needs to make as he begins his second term. on capitol hill republicans including moderate republicans are sending the president a clear warning, don't nominate susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. rice is the current u.s. ambassador to the united nations. she spent a second day meeting with senators trying to explain some of her inaccurate comments she made after the september 11th terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is joining us now from capitol hill with the ver
at the united nations. the world defies the u.s. in a historic vote for palestinians. and huge crowds are gathering in tahrir square after egypt approved a controversial new draft constitution. it's a move that's likely to inflame the political crisis there. we're live in cairo with what it all means for the region. first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. he is in pennsylvania at the toy factory talking fiscal cliff. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. [ emily jo ] derrell comes into starbucks with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me
a comment. >> susan rice has done a great job as ambassador to the united nations and, of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president but i'm very happy he has the opportunity ability to make a second term decision. >> a strong praise of support for hillary clinton. republicans have been trying to draw up controversy over the attacks but they have a big problem. ambassador rice had absolutely no role in embassy security and republicans know this basic fact, completely destroys their bogus argument. so today gop senators cooked up a whole new talking point and it might be their most offensive attack yet. >> what troubles me so much is the benghazi attack, in many ways echos the attacks on those embassies in 1998 when susan rice was head of the african region for our state department. >> my colleague from maine raised some very important questions about the embassy bombings. those are questions that should be answered as well. >> they are exploiting another national tragedy. the 1998 embassy attacks in kenya killed more than 200 people, including 12 americans ov
service. she's done a great job i think for us at the united nations. she's fought tirelessly for america's interests in very difficult times. when the united nations is a place where we often face significant challenges. and i understand that there was a lot of concern and anger initially about benghazi and about what happened and about the differences and reports but as this has been peeled back and more and more of the details have come out as best as i can make sense of it, the persistent criticism of her is that she represented the administration, went on talking -- went on different talk shows and went different radio shows and presented it based on intelligence she was given. this is far from the first time that a secretary of state u.n. ambassador has been given bad intelligence and repeated it publicly and why that makes her somehow unfit to serve as secretary of state is beyond me. in my view, if there's some unhappiness about the incidence in benghazi, some deep concern about security, there ought to be
the information that he gave before the united nations that led us into the iraq war? did that make colin powell unfit to be secretary of state or was colin powell given bad intel? i never heard him say that. i never heard lindsey graham say that. >> condoleezza rice. >> same thing with condoleezza rice. she gave bad information to congress, not just to a sunday morning talk show. to congress. to congress. >> how can you say these three people we saw on video, lindsey graham, kelly ayotte and senator john mccain are not jumping into an intelligence debate for political reasons because they did not speak up at other very key times, even perhaps more significant times in -- >> we get the point. i think we all agree. maybe there are people out there across america who are saying, you know what we really need, we really need people to fight hard night and day to sidetrack secretary of state potential candidate because of some things she said on -- maybe there's people out there. i don't know where they are because i've never met them but do want to know this. like what's their long game, willie? wha
to the united nations. and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> today, republican senators continued to try to open up the massachusetts senate seat that scott brown could run for. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> if the president wants an easy confirmation hearing and process, nominate john kerry, who is imminently qualified to be secretary of state and i believe he would sail through in the nominating process. >> joining me now, ari mel ber. ari, you're coming to us tonight from kerry country, boston and i've got to think this is a horrible moment for senator kerry. you don't want to be the guy who gets praise from the mindless attackers of susan rice. >> yeah, i don't think he wants any part of this very weird b m boomerang play the republicans are trying to practice. he knows her well because as chairman of foreign relations committee, he oversees the state department, looking at the diplomacy and ambassadors and working with secretary clinton and ambassador rice. >> well, t
. >> senator, do you think that this might have passed if the words united nations were not attached to it? talk to me about this fear of the u.n. angered the u.n., some appropriate, some not, the black helicopter deal? >> there's a lot of fear that the u.n. is somehow going to encroach on united states sovereignty and prerogatives. one of the things i thought was most sad about yesterday, was here's a veteran of world war ii, grievously wounded in the war, who spent a lifetime proving to americans that injuries didn't need to stop you from living a completely fulfilled and productive life, who had to fight like crazy to come back from those wounds, and he's on the floor, this man who defended american sovereignty, and yet people were there suggesting somehow he was there less than to defend america's sovereignty with this vote. to me that was such an amazing slap in the face and a contradiction. i think it's important not to go backwards. one of the lessons you learn here in the united states senate you live to vote another day. this treaty is not dead forever. it just stopped yesterday.
. >>> the other big story we're watching for you, a second round of sitdowns for united nations ambassador susan rice, who's in an all-out campaign of her own to face her critics. after three republicans issued blistering comments yesterday, this morning rice is meeting with republican senator susan collins of maine and in an hour is expected to meet with senator bob corker of tennessee. rice's harshest krit eks are still vowing to block her potential nomination as next secretary of state. >> i think everybody gets to, one, be nominated, and, two, go through the hearings and the debate and discussion. but right now i would be very hard-press hard-pressed. >> what they're suging is that she said things for political reasons three weeks before the election. >> what's the long game, willy? what are they doing? this doesn't help the republican party. >> that is the big question. what is the long game? let's dig down. we have our wednesday political power panel, msnbc contributor joanne reed, managing editor for the gree owe, msnbc contributor arty melbourne, also a cords for the nation, and republic
a host of international criticism also coming from the united nations saying that morsi's power grab is illegal. >> there was certainly a lot of hope for egyptians that were looking for a change with morsi after getting rid of hosni mubarak. what options are there for any type of compromise for the protesters? again, this draft resolution needs to move on for approval, but is there time to reach any type of compromise that would appease the protesters that are opposed to it? >> reporter: it seems very difficult. egypt is very divided right now. the one camp, the one here in tahrir square, is anti-morsi, anti-muslim brotherhood. they saw also that the united states has been too quick to embrace the muslim brotherhood, and that has emboldened morsi to allow himself to become a dictator or to become a new phara pharaoh. morsi is digging in. he gave a speech last night on television. it was formatted as an interview, but it was still a speech in which he said, i'm sorry. i didn't mean to take all of these extra powers, but i did it for the sake of the nation. >> nbc's richard engel in ta
endorsement yesterday when the united nations general assembly voted to upgrade its status to non-member state. >> but the united states and israel strongly, strongly oppose this resolution, claiming the unilateral move is no substitute for direct negotiations with israel. cnn foreign affairs reporter elise labott has more on this developing story in washington at the united nations and the middle east. >> good morning, john. as we said the vote is really a global endorsement of the establishment of a palestinian state. and it gives the palestinians a bit of hope and a bit of dignity after so many decades of occupation that a state is actually possible. let's take a listen to what palestinian president mahmoud abbas said after the vote yesterday. >> we did not come here seeking to legitimize a state established years ago. and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and that is palestine. >> but the u.s. is calling it an empty gesture because it doesn't really give the palestinians what they want. anything on the ground isn't l
. >> thanks for starting our morning like that, victor. >> it's a big day at the united nations. as well a big day for palestinians. they are asking members of the general assembly to approve a resolution to upgrade their status from permanent observer to nonmember state. a vote is scheduled for this afternoon and is expected to pass. >> keep in mind the united states and israel are both opposed to the resolution. let's go to cnn foreign affairs reporter live in washington. good morning. >> good morning, brooke. israel very opposed to the move. the u.s. knows this move went give the palestinians what they want -- a state. this is largely symbolic. will have no effect on sovereignty or borders. hillary clinton met with president abbas and tried to assure him not to go ahead with the move. let's listen to what she told reporters yesterday. sfm know matter what happens it will not change what i support. the only way to get a lasting solution is to commence direct negotiations and we need an environment conducive to that. we have urged both parties to refrain from actions that might in any way mak
resolution the united nations general assembly that just passed. because it places further obstacles in the path to peace. we have been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace they both deserve. two states for two peoples. they sovereign a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a won
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, romney, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how romney would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate romney was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what romney didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goalie. they just shot goals on him for four years and some of them went through and some of them didn't a
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is routine for us. people want the united states to climb out of this whole and fix this problem. the clock is ticking. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] what next, the former court shares of the former the opposite commission -- that is a commission -- deficit commission. and upcoming health policy debates in congress. washington journal begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern with headlines, calls, e-mails and tweets. >> washington worked his way up, went to harvard law school that emigrated west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after about a month journey by ship and stagecoach in train and arrived in a muddy mining town, established in law practice in a log cabin. then slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer. then got involved politically, ran for congress eight terms. then the french did abraham lincoln -- then befriended abraham lincoln and ulysses s. grant. as they are on the rise, washburn stayed with them as a close confidant during the civil war.
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)